Merton models

Don't blame the quants, says Merton

Quantitative models were unfairly criticised in the aftermath of the financial crisis, says legendary quant and co-creator of the Black-Scholes equation, but there’s plenty for quants to work on in the current environment

Low-default portfolios without simulation

Low-default portfolios are a key Basel II implementation challenge, and various statistical techniques have been proposed for use in PD estimation for such portfolios. To produce estimates using these techniques, typically Monte Carlo simulation is…

A saddle for complex credit portfolio models

Guido Giese applies the saddle-point approximation to analyse tail losses for very general credit portfolios, including correlated defaults, stochastic recovery rates, and dependency between default probabilities and recovery rates. The numerical…

A Merton approach to transfer risk

Transfer risk is the risk that debtors in a country are unable to ensure timely payments of foreign currency debt service due to transfer or exchange restrictions, or a general lack of foreign currency. Although this risk is not extensively addressed in…

A Merton approach to transfer risk

Transfer risk is the risk that debtors in a country are unable to ensure timely payments of foreign currency debt service due to transfer or exchange restrictions, or a general lack of foreign currency. Although this risk is not extensively addressed in…

Maximum likelihood estimate of default correlations

Estimating asset correlations is difficult in practice since there is little available data andmany parameters have to be found. Paul Demey, Jean-Frédéric Jouanin, Céline Roget andThierry Roncalli present a tractable version of the multi-factor Merton…

Correlated defaults: let's go back to the data

Estimates of asset value correlation are a key element of Merton-style credit portfoliomodels. Many practitioners have access to asset value data for a large universe of listedfirms, so estimation is within reach. Alan Pitts describes a statistical…

Multi-factor adjustment

The author presents an analytical method for calculating portfolio value-at-risk and expected shortfall in the multi-factor Merton framework. This method is essentially an extension of the granularity adjustment technique to a new dimension.

You need to sign in to use this feature. If you don’t have a Risk.net account, please register for a trial.

Sign in
You are currently on corporate access.

To use this feature you will need an individual account. If you have one already please sign in.

Sign in.

Alternatively you can request an indvidual account here: