Technical paper/Tail risk

Cutting Edge introduction: Followers of fashion

Focusing on how often a trading strategy ends on the winning side can distract from the question of whether it profits on average. The key is in the return distribution’s skew – and at least for trend-following strategies this can be directly controlled…

Generalising universal performance measures

Performance and risk measurement are fundamental quantitative activities in finance, andnew ways of measuring them are always of interest. A recently proposed procedure is theuniversal performance measure. Theofanis Darsinos and Stephen Satchell show…

Contributions to credit risk

Optimisation of credit portfolios requires that risk contributions be quantified. However, there has been disagreement over which of three popular tail risk measures should be used. Here, Alexandre Kurth and Dirk Tasche offer a way forward, showing how…

Contributions to credit risk

Optimisation of credit portfolios requires that risk contributions be quantified. However, there has been disagreement over which of three popular tail risk measures should be used. Here, Alexandre Kurth and Dirk Tasche offer a way forward, showing how…

What causes crashes?

Are large market events caused by easily identifiable exogenous shocks such as major newsevents, or can they occur endogenously, without apparent external cause, as an inherent propertyof the market itself? Here, Didier Sornette, Yannick Malevergne and…

Extreme forex moves

What is the appropriate statistical description of tail risk in a market portfolio? In the context offoreign exchange, Peter Blum and Michel Dacorogna address this problem using extreme valuetheory. Using 20 years of data, they estimate parameters for an…

Op risk modelling for extremes

Part 2: Statistical methods In this second of two articles, Rodney Coleman, of Imperial College London, continues his demonstration of the uncertainty in measuring operational risk from small samples of loss data.

Calculating portfolio loss

For credit portfolios, analytical methods work best for tail risk, while Monte Carlo is used to model expected loss. However, products such as CDOs require a model for the entire distribution. Sandro Merino and Mark Nyfeler meet the challenge by…

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