Role of the dice: how Susquehanna puts game theory to work

One of the world’s largest options traders uses game theory – and poker practice – to get results

Cards chips and dice

Running poker tournaments to recruit college students to Susquehanna International Group (SIG) – one of the world’s largest quantitative trading firms – may be something of a modern myth. But it’s not too far off the mark.

Susquehanna’s leadership believes the skillset that reaps rewards in poker is closely allied to that required for trading. A major proponent of game theory, the firm uses in-house poker games to talk through decision-making in trading – and runs an annual, no-limit Texas hold

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